TEMPLAR TIMES

CREATIVE GODSPARK & GOOD-BYES

"Our saints of femme masculinity and fierce vulnerability." - stated perfectly by Facebook User  Anastasia Hal Krylov . Gorgeous artwork by Scarlett River (check out her own beautiful creative work and store at):  https://www.etsy.com/shop/DirtyLola

"Our saints of femme masculinity and fierce vulnerability." - stated perfectly by Facebook User Anastasia Hal Krylov. Gorgeous artwork by Scarlett River (check out her own beautiful creative work and store at): https://www.etsy.com/shop/DirtyLola

THERE IS NO GREATER EVIDENCE OF DIVINE SPARK WITHIN OURSELVES, THAN OUR ABILITY TO CREATE. Spirit and Divine Mastery takes many forms within our own Being.

The mass outpouring of love, appreciation and grief over the loss of popular culture icons and creative masters is evidence of this power we hold within ourselves to connect, transform and heal through our own Divine creations, in whatever form it may manifest.

Marvel, if you will, at the healing, beautiful and transmuting Violet Light bath we are all receiving as we bid farewell to another unique creative visionary we knew as Prince -- whether he was your cup of musical tea or not. ‪#‎whodoesntloveprincecmon‬

Great excerpt below on the subject from this article: http://www.colsoncenter.org/…/15602-the-image-of-god-and-cr…

CREATIVITY AND HUMAN LIFE

Christians don’t talk much about creativity as a crucial aspect of what it means to be human, and few formal theologians address it in connection with the image of God. Part of the reason for this is history: originally, theologians argued that only God could “create” (Latin creare), which for them meant producing something out of nothing (Latin ex nihilo); human beings could only “make” (Latin facere) things out of already existing material.

And yet, as Dorothy Sayers pointed out, “It is observable that in the passage leading up to the statement … [that man is made in the image of God], he has given no detailed information about God. Looking at man, he sees in him something essentially divine, but when we turn back to see what he says about the original upon which the ‘image’ of God was modelled, we find only the single assertion, ‘God created’. The characteristic common to God and man is apparently that: the desire and the ability to make things.”

Similarly, J.R.R. Tolkien, another great English writer who travelled in the same circles as Sayers, emphasized the idea of “sub-creation” in producing his fantasy works, striving to create a coherent, consistent secondary world. He saw this process of sub-creation “as a form of worship, a way for creatures to express the divine image in them by becoming creators.” (Full Article Here)